23-Mar-2012

Turning the tables on vibration

Abstract

As nanoscale equipment becomes more prevalent, lab sites are being set up in more severe vibration-prone environments, such as upper floors of buildings and cleanrooms. Traditional pneumatic vibration isolators – air tables – are increasingly challenged by the requirements of more sensitive equipment and expanded lab facilities. Negative-Stiffness isolation is rapidly gaining popularity in industrial and laboratory environments, mainly because of its ability to isolate vibration effectively in diverse and challenging environments.

As a method for vibration isolation, the traditional air table is now being challenged by the more compact and effective Negative-Stiffness vibration isolators, developed by Minus K Technology.

For almost 40 years pneumatic vibration isolators – air tables – have been the mainstay for stabilising industry and academia’s most critical micro-engineering instrumentation. But just as technology has been migrating steadily from micro to nano, so has the need for more precise vibration isolation in micro-electronics fabrication, industrial laser/optical systems and biological research.

These so-called “passive system” air tables are now being seriously challenged by the newer Negative-Stiffness vibration isolators. Negative-Stiffness isolation is rapidly gaining popularity in industrial and laboratory environments, mainly because of its ability to isolate vibration effectively in diverse and challenging environments.

Air tables are now being seriously challenged by the newer Negative-Stiffness vibration isolators

Negative-Stiffness mechanism vibration isolation systems were invented by Dr David Platus, who worked in the nuclear, aerospace and defence industries conducting and directing analysis and design projects in structural-mechanical systems; he holds more than 20 patents related to shock and vibration isolation.

In 1993 Platus founded Minus K Technology to develop, manufacture and market vibration isolation products based on the company’s patented technology. The resulting products, sold under the trade name Nano-K, are used in a broad spectrum of applications, including nanotechnology, biological sciences, semiconductors, materials research, zero-g simulation of spacecraft and high-end audio.

. . .

This is a small extract of the full article which is available ONLY to subscribers. Subscribers sign-in (top right) to read the article.

Or

Subscribe now to Cleanroom Technology

Email this story